Brandt Krueger

Freelance Technical Meeting and Event Production, Education, Speaking, and Consulting. Geek Dad, Husband

Consultant, Meeting and Event Technology
Owner, Event Technology Consulting
Instructor, Event Leadership Institute
Cohost, #EventIcons - Where the icons of the event industry meet

Filtering by Tag: event planning

Pro Tips for Saving Money on your AV Bill

(An edited version of this article was originally published in MeetingMentor Magazine in Fall 2018. Updated February, 2019)

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If there’s one universal truth for all events, it’s that there’s no such thing as an unlimited budget. Even world-class sporting events and megalithic awards shows have their limits. Every planner, at one point or another, is faced with the limits of their own budget and is forced to find a way to save a few dollars.

There’s plenty of big-ticket items on events: the venue, catering, transportation. Most of those costs are easily understood and can be adjusted based on the level of quality and service desired. If you want to save money on the evening dinner, you may need to change the menu or choose a lower cut of meat for your guests. If you want to save money on transportation, your folks are flyin’ coach!

When it comes to AV, however, far too many planners still just accept “the price is the price” on a bid full of equipment they don’t understand or collapse under pressure from the venue to “just use the in-house”, stacking on fees and charges as disincentives to bringing in your own AV company. There’s plenty of good reasons to use an in-house AV company, but let’s be honest- price isn’t usually one of them.

Let’s take a deeper look into that and a few other ways to save money on your AV bill!

Back to School: Learn More About AV

This one’s probably the more difficult, so let’s tackle it first. I’ve heard so many planners and other event folks say, “Oh, I’m just not techie, I could never learn that stuff.” But here’s the thing… You’ve probably never heard someone saying, “Oh, I’m not French, so I could never learn French.” AV is just a language, and if you just spend a little time learning the lingo, you’re able to enter into a more informed conversation with your AV providers.

If you’re still in school, make sure you find out if they offer an AV 101 class. More and more schools are providing these as part of their hospitality programs, thank goodness! If you’re out of school, take advantage of industry conferences and associations that provide education sessions. Keep an eye out for AV and other tech-related classes. Full disclosure: I teach an online technical meeting production course for planners, but that’s not why I include this point. Education really is one of the best ways to save money on your AV.

Why? Because most of the time when AV providers “bulk up” their order, it’s not because they want to cheat you, it’s because they want to cover their, umm… bases. The more you sound like you know what you’re talking about, the more likely they are to take you at your word that what you want is what you need. That helps make sure you only get the equipment you need, and nothing more thrown in, “just in case”. Your quotes are going to be more accurate, so you’ll truly be only paying for what you need.

House Party: In-house AV vs. 3rd Party

Most experience planners have at least a couple of horror stories when it comes to using in-house AV companies. I always try to remind folks that crew vary wildly from property to property and city to city just like any AV company, so it’s important to take these stories with a grain of salt. There is something that’s true more often than not, however, and that’s in-house AV companies tend to be more expensive. Why? Well, lots of reasons dealing with economics, real-estate, and market differences, but the easy one to understand is this: they’re convenient.

Much like the $8.00 can of soda in the hotel lobby store, you’re paying for convenience. The equipment is all on site in case you need something last minute, and at the end of the show, it all goes on the master bill. No muss, no fuss.

Unfortunately, many venues will discourage you from shopping around and trying to get a lower price. Many will have penalties in their contracts if you choose to bring in a 3rd party company or will revoke certain concessions like free wifi. But don’t let that stop you! No matter what, I always recommend people getting at least one 3rd party bid. They’re almost always less expensive, sometimes even with the penalties and discounts. I once saw a client save almost $10,000 by bringing in a 3rd party AV company, and that included paying the hotel a penalty!

Negotiate, Negotiate, Negotiate

Some people prefer to use the in-house because it’s so convenient, and that’s OK. But you should still get at least one bid from a third party. Why? Leverage. The biggest thing that getting educated and getting additional bids enables you to do is negotiate. An in-house company will more often than not come down in price if they know you’re seriously shopping around. Be tactful, be polite, but don’t be afraid- you don’t have to go all Godfather on them. You’d be surprised how often, “Look, guys. I want to use you, but this other crew is willing to do it for $10k less. Can you at least meet me halfway?” will work!

And if you’re worried about the quality of your crew, one final tip: don’t be afraid to ask for references. We do it all the time with 3rd party AV companies, so why not do it with the in-house? Ask the venue to be put in touch with the most recent clients to use the in-house AV. It shouldn’t be an issue, and it might even be a red flag if they’re unwilling to do so. That might give you more leverage if you’d rather use a 3rd party, as no respectable venue should force you to use a vendor that was getting bad reviews.

What are your favorite tips for saving money on your AV bill?

The One Question Survey: What Would It Be for Your Event?

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If you could boil down your post-event survey down to one question, what would it be?

 

Recently I needed to call customer service for Delta Airlines regarding a possible change to my itinerary. Normally I’d use the web interface or mobile app for these types of things, but in this case apparently what I was trying to do somehow violated Asimov’s 3 Laws of Robotics, so digital methods were just not cooperating. I was forced to *GASP* use the telephone and talk to a real, live person.

The service representative was extremely pleasant, worked through several multi-city flight scenarios, trying each in turn to see how much they cost, including change fees, routing through various hubs, and other tricks of the trade. She was patient and creative as we tried out each possibility in the system. Wow, what a rare and wonderful customer service experience!

As she concluded the call, an automated voice asked me if I wanted to participate in a one question survey. I’m not normally good for completing ratings or surveys unless they’re only a couple of questions, and have abandoned more than my fair share of surveys once they’ve gone past the first page. But one question? I could handle that. Especially since my experience had been so great. I wanted to make sure my service rep was rewarded, and I was intrigued- what kind of information could you glean about my 20 minute call from one question?

The question was simple, brilliant, and not at all what I expected. It went something like this: “When thinking of the representative that just helped you, how likely would you be to hire them as a customer service representative?” I was presented with a 1-5 scale, I punched in the highest score, and that was it. Thank you, and goodbye.

Obviously, I was impressed with the power of that one question. Impressed enough to immediately jot it down as something I’d have to write about later. It got me thinking about the post-event surveys we deal with on a regular basis. As I mentioned a moment ago, I don’t have much tolerance for lengthy surveys, especially those where every response is marked “Required Field.” Unfortunately, far too often we see exactly that kind of survey as a follow up to our events.

How many people started your post-event survey, then abandoned it once they realized what they were getting into? How much of a representative sample are you really getting when only 5% of your attendees fill out your survey completely? There seems to be a hesitancy on the part of survey creators to have too few questions, as if important insights can’t be gleaned from a short survey, and that only pages and pages of required fields can get you the information you need.

But… what if… all you needed was just one question?

“Would you attend this event next year?” seems too simple, and doesn’t tell you much about anything. “Would you recommend this event to a friend?” Maybe, a little closer. But what about something like this: “If you were spend your own money, and not your organization’s, would you attend this event next year?” Getting closer. There are definitely events that I would only attend if the costs were being covered by someone else. There are others that I likely would pay my own money to attend.

So what would your event’s one question survey be? Leave a comment and let me know!