Brandt Krueger

Freelance Technical Meeting and Event Production, Education, Speaking, and Consulting. Geek Dad, Husband

Consultant, Meeting and Event Technology
Owner, Event Technology Consulting
Instructor, Event Leadership Institute
Cohost, #EventIcons - Where the icons of the event industry meet

Filtering by Category: Android

How to Fix a Loose Charging Port on a Nexus 6 (and probably a lot of phones)

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I love my Nexus 6, but since day one the charging port has always felt like most USB cables didn't go all the way in. As it approached the 2 year old mark, this condition had gotten steadily worse to the point that any and all cables would simply fall out given a stiff breeze.

I searched and searched online, but as often happens if you don't create the exact right set of search terms, I came up pretty empty. A lot of articles blamed "non-OEM" cables, others said they sent theirs back to Google for a replacement.

Even though it was way out of warranty, I did contact Google. They had no answers, suggesting I contact Motorola for hardware support. I was disappointed, but it triggered an idea- I started searching for articles about loose connections on Motorola phones, and not specifically the Nexus 6. Now things started coming up, and with a little digging I found this post on XDA Developers: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1856180

In it, user telmosousa describes how using a toothpick, you can clean out the port on your phone. The toothpicks I had were even still too large, so I literally had to whittle one down to get into the port and... sure enough, a disgusting amount of lint and other crud scraped right out. My charging port is back to its like-new "not quite looking all the way plugged in but nonetheless fully functional" condition!

Whenever I find a "how to" that took me forever to find, I do try and post it here for others!

Hope this helps some people out!

Google Chrome Update Could Boost Web-Based Event Apps

 

Native meeting and event app providers may have to start updating their marketing materials.

Native apps (the kind you download from the Apple App Store or Google Play) have always touted among their list of benefits their ability to send push notifications, access the camera, and the ease of adding the app to the home screen of a device.  Web-enabled apps, sometimes called web-only apps, exist only in a device’s Internet browser, and therefore have been unable to access the camera or send push notifications.  They also can be somewhat confusing as to how to add a shortcut icon to the home screen.  

Google is starting to change all that.

With a recent update to Chrome for Android, Google is now allowing web partners to push notifications to users, even when Chrome isn’t actively open. The early adopters include Beyond the Rack, eBay, FanSided, Pinterest, Product Hunt, VICE News, and believe it or not, Facebook.  That last one interests me the most, as I’ve detested Facebook’s native app for Android for some time. The ability to get basic notifications, though, might actually get me to check in more than every couple of weeks.

The request for notification access is pretty straightforward, and once you’ve granted a site access, you can revoke it at any time through the app’s settings.  Also, “Block” means “go away forever, and don’t ask me again,” so you won’t have to worry about a site asking every time you visit.

To make the websites you access regularly easy to get to, they've also baked in the ability to have an “Add to Homescreen” button on mobile sites to easily add an icon to the user’s home screen with just one click.  This will allow mobile event app developers to get their apps easily and seamlessly onto the coveted front page of users phones and devices.

 Source: Google

Source: Google

And finally, the “holy grail” of mobile app development: access to the camera. With just a few simple lines of code, developers can ask for, and be granted, access to a device camera, allowing web-enabled apps to grab snapshots for use in social media, photo feeds, or other event purposes.

Clearly Google is trying to reduce number of differences between mobile web sites and native apps, and in a post released on the Google Chromium Blog, they attempted tell us why:

“Unfortunately, once users discover [a mobile web] experience they love, it is hard for them to build a meaningful relationship since websites lack the engaging capabilities developers have come to expect from mobile such as push notifications and home screen icons. As a result, developers have needed to decide between the engagement potential of a native app and the reach potential of a mobile website.”

And that’s the same decision that event organizers have had to make as well- deciding between the engagement opportunities that come from using native apps with full access to push notifications and the phone’s hardware (camera, microphone, etc.) or the easy to change/update on the fly benefits of mobile web development, not the least of which is not having to get approved, or rejected, by the Almighty Apple in a reasonable amount of time.

The update, which has already begun to roll out, is currently only available for Android.  Knowing how locked down Apple is, I fear that it may stay that way for the short term.  Nonetheless, this is a big step in achieving parity between native and web-enabled meeting and event applications, one that Google is willing to support and promote with all it’s Googley might.

More Info:
http://blog.chromium.org/2015/04/reaching-and-re-engaging-users-on.html
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/04/google-wants-to-power-up-the-web-with-push-notifications-and-home-icons/
Thanks to Eric Bidelman for calling camera access the Holy Grail in his blog post:
http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/getusermedia/intro/
 

Enable On-Screen Android Navigation Buttons on the Galaxy S3 (Requires Root)

On Screen Navigation on S3

***UPDATE*** If you're using the latest builds of CyanogenMod, you don't need to do this! Just go to Settings, Buttons, and check the "Enable on-screen nav bar" box. Et voila!

OK, this is one that's fun to try.  You'll either:

  1. Love it -or-
  2. Hate it

I know it might seem redundant with the hardware softkeys on the the Galaxy S3, but I really like this mod and it's one of the first things I do after flashing a new rom.  The S3 has plenty of screen real estate to handle it, and I find it a much faster way of navigating around the phone, with faster access to app switching and Google Now.  Also, frequently while trying to reach down to the "Back" hardware button with my left hand, the phone feels like it's going to shoot out of my hand like a bar of soap.

To enable the on-screen navigation buttons:

Use a file explorer (like Root Explorer) to navigate to

/system/build.prop

and open the file with a text editor.  Add the line

qemu.hw.mainkeys=0

at the end of the file.  Save and close.  Reboot.  Done

That's it!

Be advised, there a are a few apps that don't behave well with the keys, such as the camera.  For some reason (probably because it's a stock app) instead of resizing, it partially covers up some of the controls.  Still completely usable though.

For extra credit, you might try one of these other mods...

Disable the softkeys: Navigate to

/system/usr/keylayout/sec_touchkey.kl

and open the file with a text editor. You will a giant list of key numbers and what they do.  Try to find these...

key 172    HOME key 158    BACK key 139    MENU

Add a # before any key you don't wan't to use anymore.  Save and reboot.

Thanks to jastonas over on XDA for the post!

Prevent the "HOME" key from waking your phone up: Personally, I like to keep the softkeys engaged.  I do still use them from time to time, such as when you can't find the freaking "MENU" key on a poorly designed app.  But, in a completely made up statistic, I have found that accidental pocket-engagement of the "HOME" key is responsible for 80% of battery loss.

Navigate to

system/usr/keylayout/sec_keys.kl

and open the file with a text editor. You will see this...

key 115    VOLUME_UP           WAKE key 114    VOLUME_DOWN     WAKE key 172    HOME                     WAKE key 116    POWER                   WAKE

Just delete the word "WAKE" from the "HOME" key (or more if you like, but be careful you still need a way to wake your phone!!!).  Save and reboot.

Thanks to Eric over on Galaxy S3 Forums for the post!

That's all there is to it!  So now that the S4 is coming out, is anyone getting antsy to trade in their S3?  Personally over a year in I'm still happy as a clam...

Galaxy SIII Owners: Make Google Voice Actions (and now Google Now) the Default Instead of S-Voice

*** UPDATE 12/20/12 *** While I'm still recommending Home2 Shortcut (easier on the eyes and more functionality), reports are coming in that Bluetooth Launcher will still work with 4.1.1.  Apparently you just need to select a different activity. Process is updated in the post, but I was unable to get it to work on either my or my wife's S3.

*** UPDATE 12/18/12 ***

Based on the comments and questions below, it appears that Blootooth Launcher does not work this way anymore with Android 4.1.1.  If someone figures out a way to make it work again, leave a comment and I'll update this page.

I now am recommending Home2 Shortcut for this getting direct access to Voice Search (which contains most of the original Voice Actions).

I found it over on XDA Developers and it can be found on the Play Store.  It allows you to set Home Double Press as well as other key combinations.  I found "Voice Search" under "Activities->Google", but YMMV.

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Some of the more popular posts on this blog have had nothing to do with Event Technology per se, but rather have been tips and tricks that I myself found hard to find and decided to repost when I found the answer.

This is one of those posts!

I searched for a really long time to find a way to make Google Voice Actions, instead of  S-Voice, the default action when double pressing the Home key on my fancy new Samsung Galaxy SIII.  I just couldn't get S-Voice to do what I wanted it to do, and it was basically useless in the car.  Turns out there's a clever little workaround using a 3rd party app that isn't actually designed for that specific purpose!  The tip comes from Sorka over on Android Forums and is a great little workaround.  NO ROOT REQUIRED!!

Here's the trick:

  1. Download and Install "Bluetooth Launch" from the Google Play store.
  2. Open Bluetooth Launch and scroll down to "Voice Search". (*See update below*)
  3. Tap on it to expand it out, then select: "com.google.android.voicesearch.RecognitionActivity" (*Update* Some are reporting that on Android 4.1.1 you need to use this: "Google Search->com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox.VoiceSearchActivity"  I have been unable to verify)
  4. Exit by hitting the back key.
  5. Double click the home button.
  6. Select "Always complete using this activity"
  7. Select Bluetooth Launch.

You're Done!

Thanks again, Sorka, works like a charm, and there's a metric crapton of other options offered by Bluetooth Launcher.  Nice workaround!

Meanwhile everyone, how are you liking your S3?